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Posts Tagged ‘lake orion michigan real estate’

The Preserve, Lake Orion MI- Are Prices Rebounding?

the preserve lake orion miThe Preserve is a very nice neighborhood in southern Lake Orion with easy access to I-75. Some of the many amenities that make The Preserve desirable are city water and sewer, sidewalks, subdivision lake, club house with a swimming pool, tennis courts and play ground area. The sub is also surrounded by woods which added value to the perimeter lots when build jobs were sold; value that seems to have stuck to the homes even in the current housing market.

The home values in The Preserve were hit hard just like the rest of Lake Orion. Many of the homes sold new in 1996-1998 with prices ranging at that time throughout the $200’s with an occasional home selling in the low $300’s.

In 2005 home prices ranged from $287,000-$372,000 and in 2003 and 2004 a couple homes sold in the low $400’s. This year prices have ranged from $155,000-$285,000.

So now you may be asking yourself- “Where does the title of this blog post come from?”

After 2005 prices were on a downward trend all over Lake Orion and The Preserves was no different. Prices steadily declined every year after 2005….. Until 2010. It appears that in many neighborhoods prices are starting to stabilize and the same is holding true in The Preserve. In fact, due to the lack of foreclosures in The Preserve, home prices may actually be arching the other way.

First let’s compare 2008 and 2009 home sale prices.

In 2008 there were 4 sales in The Preserve ranging from $255,000-$275,000. All selling for pretty close to what they sold for new. None of the 4 sales in 2008 were bank owned or short sales.

Prices dropped hugely from 2008 and 2009 with 6 sales in 2009 ranging from $211,000-$260,000 with no bank owned sales and 1 short sale.

Now comes 2010. One of the differences in 2010 was there was 1 bank owned home and 2 short sales. The 3 distressed sales in 2010 were of course the 3 lowest priced sales ranging from $155,000-$211,000. Now let’s compare the non-distressed home sales between 2009 and 2010.

There were 5 non-distressed home sales in The Preserve in 2009
There were 7 non-distressed home sales in The Preserve in 2010

2009 sale prices ranged from $211,000-$260,000
2010 sale prices ranged from $215,000-$285,000

2009 price per square foot ranged from $89/sq. ft. to $110/sq. ft.
2010 price per square foot ranged from $91/sq. ft. to $108/sq. ft.

A little deeper look at prices show that in 2009 there was only 1 home that sold for more than $100/sq. ft. where as 5 houses broke the $100/sq. ft. price point in 2010. Even the 3 distressed sales in 2010 ranged from $82/sq. ft. to $96/sq. ft.

The price differences in the non distressed sales in 2010 seem to be the same as in the past- location within the sub a primary factor in sale price and walk out basement also adding to value.

As of December 24, 2010 there were no sales pending and one active listing with an asking price of $299,900. If you currently live in The Preserve you can only hope they get pretty close to that price.

Jackie Hawley
cell: (248)736-6407
Jackie@JackieHawley.com

The Preserve, Lake Orion MI

For Sellers

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Rolling Meadows, Lake Orion

Rolling Meadows, Lake Orion real estate sales are a bit strongerrolling meadows lake orion real estate this year than in 2009. In 2009 there were 16 closed sales in Rolling Meadows and 4 leases with sale prices ranging from $153,000-$247,000 and lease prices ranging from $1500-$1800/month.

In 2010 there have been 14 closed sales in Rolling Meadows as of Dec. 24 with sale prices ranging from $164,505-$237,000.

In 2010 there have been 5 foreclosure sales
In 2009 there was only 1 foreclosure sale

In 2010 there have been no short sale closings
In 2009 there were 2 short sale closings

In 2010 there were 4 closings under $200,000 and all were bank owned
In 2009 there were 5 closings under $200,000- 1 was bank owned, 1 was a short sale

In 2010 there were 6 sales of $220,000 or more
In 2009 there were 2 sales of $220,000 or more

If you take out the distressed sales in Rolling Meadows, Lake Orion the price per square foot in 2010 ranged from $79/square foot – $111/square foot.

In 2009 the price per square foot for non distressed sales in Rolling Meadows ranged from $78/square foot – $97/square foot.

In 2010 of the 9 non distressed sales in Rolling Meadows, Lake Orion

  • 3 sales so far closed for over $100/square foot 
  • only 3 non distressed sales closed for less than $90/square foot
  • 3 closed for over $90/square foot but under $100/square foot 

In 2009, of the 13 non distressed sales in Rolling Meadows 

  • none of them exceeded $100/square foot
  • only 5 sold for over $90/square foot
  • leaving 8 non distressed sales in Rolling Meadows selling for less than $90/square foot

There are currently 2 houses pending short sale approval so we won’t know the prices until the short sales are approved and the homes close.  And there are currently no homes for sale or lease in Rolling Meadows, Lake Orion.

If you are considering selling your home in Rolling Meadows please don’t hesitate to call me.

Jackie Hawley
cell: (248)736-6407
email: Jackie@JackieHawley.com

Rolling Meadows, Lake Orion

Lake Orion Homes for Sale 

For Sellers

Market Analysis

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Round Tree Lake Orion Real Estate Sales

Round Tree is a 223 home sub in Orion Township with entrances off M-24 and Scripps Rd. Houses in Round Tree were built between 1993 and 2003 and range in size from 1828 square feet to 2767 square feet with most of the houses well over 2000 square feet.

round tree lake orion miRound Tree homes have city water and sewer, sidewalks, community park and abuts Bald Mountain Recreation Area to the east. Lake Orion High School with a swimming pool and tennis courts is across Scripps Road. Round Tree is conveniently located just minutes north of I-75; the exit 81 ramp exits (or enters) at M-24 a few miles south of Round Tree. That exit is also just one exit from Great Lakes Crossing. Orion Oaks County Park and the Bark Park are also within 5 minutes from Round Tree. About 5 minutes north is the public access to all sports Lake Orion.

Many of the homes that have sold this year have been bank owned homes; 6 of the 9 salesorion oaks bark park were foreclosures, 2 were short sales and 1 “regular” sale. Not very different from 2009 which also saw 9 sales- 5 foreclosures and 4 “regular” sales. The good news is that the sale prices this year are about on par with last year ranging from just over $150,000 to just under $200,000 with the foreclosures selling for the most part for sixty something per square foot and the privately owned homes selling for eighty something per square foot. Many of these homes sold for well over $200,000 new and a couple sold in the mid three hundreds.

In 2003 sale prices in Round Tree ranged from $225,000 to $349,900. At that time things like location in the sub, 4 bedroom versus 3 bedroom, 3 car garage versus 2 car garage were determining factors in pricing. Price per square foot ranged from $107/sq. ft. to $140/sq. ft. In 2009 and 2010 prices seem to be determined more by ownership- the banks heavily discounted their homes and private owners were able to get a bit more.

If you currently live in Round Tree and wish to move (or have to move) and don’t want to short sale your house, you might want to consider renting it out. With the amount of people in the Lake Orion area who have lost their homes, the rental market is strong, and if you are considering upgrading in this strong buyer’s market, renting your current home in Round Tree may be a viable option.

If you would like to purchase a home in Round Tree that you may not have been able to afford a few years ago, now is a good time to take advantage of the super low prices and low interest rates. Many of the houses currently selling for about $100K less than their previous sale price, but prices have seemed to bottom out. In 2008 there was only 1 sale below $200,000. In both 2009 and 2010 nothing sold above $200,000, and there seems to be really no difference in the prices in 2009 and 2010. Combine that with the fact that Lake Orion/Orion Township prices on average are on the rise (slightly), it truly feels like Round Tree has hit bottom.

Jackie Hawley
cell: (248)736-6407
email: Jackie@JackieHawley.com

Home buyer blog: http://SoutheastMichiganRealEstate.wordpress.com

Home seller blog: http://SellingRealEstateInSoutheastMichigan.wordpress.com

Search the MLS

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Lake Orion Michigan- Sale Prices Up 4 Months In a Row!

Normally hearing that year to date median sale prices are down 3.4% wouldn’t be good new. But when you consider Lake Orion Michigan/Orion Township Michigan prices have been plummeting since 2005, a slight decrease in prices truly is good news.

Even better news is the median sale price has been up over the previous year the last 4 months in a row. And the extraordinary news is the total sales volume is up from last year.

lake orion michigan median sales price by month

Median Sales Price Through August
2009: $152,000
2010: $146,850

Unit Sales Through August
2009: 227
2010: 270

Bank Owned Sales Through August
2009: 113
2010: 99

Short Sales Through August
2009: 20
2010: 54

Total Sales Volume Through August
2009: $38,935,780
2010: $41,645,700

Active Listings
9/28/2009: 235 with a median asking price of $209,900
9/18/2010: 159 with a median asking price of $174,900

Are we on a recovery in Lake Orion Michigan? It’s hard to say right now; only time will tell if this is a trend. The reduction of both bank owned homes and the major reduction of inventory could certainly contribute to a stabilization of prices. The increase of both unit sales and total volume is also encouraging.

The best way to determine how a specific subdivision or neighborhood is doing is to contact me for a market analysis or for a more general idea of neigoborhood prices check out the neigoborhood pages linked below.

Individual Neighborhood Sales and Community Information

Lake Orion Michigan/Orion Township Michigan Sales Data

Lake Orion Michigan Homes For Sale

Search The MLS

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It’s no big secret that Michigan residents in general have been going through some rough economic times. I say in general, because not everybody is hurting. But with unemployment/underemployment at 20% or more many Michiganders have felt a financial pinch.

Some of that financial pinch shows in many of the houses that have sold in the past few years. Not as well maintained and some foreclosures are downright destroyed. For those who have taken advantage of our buyers’ market, you will more than likely need/want to make repairs and improvements on those homes. And while making those repairs and improvements you may want to consider the fact that the cost of energy has been on the increase with no end in site at this time.  Personally, my electric use is down, but my electric bill is higher than for the same period last year.

We can only tackle the cost of power itself with constant contact with Congress people (Cap and Trade, etc) and in the voting booth this fall. But we DO have some control on the amount of electricity and gas we use and get some of our tax dollars back in the process via tax credits and rebates.

There are Federal tax credits that don’t expire until 2016 for items such as Geothermal Heat Pumps, Residential Wind Turbines and Solar Energy Systems- 30% of cost with no upper limit.

And there are Federal tax credits that expire December 31, 2010 for 30% of the cost up to $1500 for items such as “biomass stoves” known to the rest of us as wood stoves (or corn, or pellets), central air, heating, water heaters, insulation, windows, doors, and roofing. You should go to the federal government web site for details and exclusions and consult with your accountant before purchasing anything.

Not covered are items like ceiling fans, CFL’s- those swirly light bulbs made in China (the last American light bulb factory just closed down), toilets, electric furnaces/boilers (like we all have natural gas available), clothes washers and dryers….

You state may have it’s own credits or rebates. Some of the rebates for the state of Michigan have run out of money (but there is sill money in the budget to promote breast feeding), but there is still some money left for the purchase of refrigerators, clothes washers and dishwashers. Check this web site for details.

If you are getting ready to sell your curent home, some energy efficient improvements may help when competing against the rest of the houses on the market.

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Michigan Tax Legislation Now in the House of Representatives- Good News for Home Buyers and Sellers

A brief explanation of how Michigan property taxes work. We have what is called the homestead exemption for a person’s primary residence in The Great Lakes State, which basically means if the house is your primary residence you get a break on the millage rate- up to 18 mills. On a house valued at $200K- or a taxable value of $100K- 18 mills equals $1800. Not chump change.

The way the law currently works is if you buy a house that isn’t a primary residence, such as a bank owned home, you must close and file your homestead exemption with the township prior to May 1. If you file after May 1, you will pay the higher rate for the remainder of the year. So if you close on your house in June, you will have both the summer and winter tax bill at the higher rate.

Today I received an E-News Special Alert in my in box from the Michigan Association of Realtors letting me (and everybody else in their e-blast) know that Senate Bill 77 passed the Michigan Senate today with a vote of 36-0 and now moves to the House of Representatives. The email states that “This legislation would provide for an additional principal residence filing date of October 1st.” It goes on to state an amendment was added to move that date to November 1 for 2010 only. It wasn’t specific as to whether you have to file ON Oct. 1 or BY Oct. 1. As I find out more details, I will update you.

In the meantime you may want to contact your state rep to let them know how you want them to vote. I have also found when I need more details on a piece of legislation, my rep has had no problems in the past emailing me the complete text of a bill. Remember- our representatives work FOR us.

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The Foreclosure Process in Southeast Michigan

Many of the numbers the media likes to spout about homes going into foreclosure are a bit exaggerated. When you read about the number of homes in foreclosure the stats often quoted are the notices of foreclosure that have been served- not the new bank owned listings. There are also companies like Realty Trac that publish specific houses as foreclosed homes. And technically while that that may be true, those houses are not for sale and may never come up for sale.

Below is my attempt to dispell the myths floating around about foreclosures and explain as simply as possible how the foreclosure process works in Southeast Michigan.

Typically a person needs to be behind on their house payment by 3 months or more before they receive a notice of foreclosure. That notice of foreclosure will have a date for the sheriff’s sale– usually a couple months off. The bank (or first lien holder if there are multiple loans on a house) will buy the house back at the sheriff’s sale for the amount of the mortgage or fair market value or someplace in between.

After the sheriff’s sale the owner has what is called a redemption period to pay off their mortgage(s). Most homes will have a 6 month redemption period. Homes on 3 plus acres will have a year to redeem. During this entire time the owner still has full rights of use and has the ability to sell. But the media will still call these homes bank owned or “in foreclosure” during this period.

Many of these homes will never go back to the bank. Some people will catch up before it ever gets to the sheriff’s sale. Some will sell during that time; some people still do have equity in their homes and others may be willing and able to bring cash to the closing. Others will sell via the short sale route. Many times a lender will delay the sheriff’s sale if the owner is in the process of a short sale. Some will even extend the redemption period if necessary rather than take the house back and sell as an REO (bank owned) property.

I’m finding that the amount of true bank owned sales in North Oakland County are on the decline and a major increase in short sale closings. For very detailed sales statics please click the links below for very dry and for many boring sales data for Lake Orion, Oxford and Clarkston Michigan.

Lake Orion Michigan sales data

Oxford Michigan sales data

Clarkston Michigan sales data

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